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Storm Drainage

The Storm Drainage Utility was created to address recurring local flooding within the City of Auburn. The focus of the Utility is to effectively manage stormwater within the City through:

  • Drainage system planning
  • System improvement
  • Development regulation
  • System maintenance

The Storm Drainage Utility operates and maintains approximately 199 miles of pipe, 10,000 catch basins and manholes, 159 stormwater facilities, 6 pump stations and 27 miles of ditch. The storm system is designed to convey rainwater from the streets and properties of the City to nearby creeks and rivers.

In 2007 the City was issued a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit by the Washington State Department of Ecology. This requires the City to prepare and implement a stormwater management program to improve the quality of the water discharged from the City's storm drainage system into the Green and White Rivers, Mill Creek, and into the groundwater below the City. The Storm Drainage Utility coordinates the City's NPDES response as well as works on regional efforts to manage flooding and improve water quality.

The City of Auburn will be accepting comments on the draft 2017 Stormwater Management Program Plan through March 6th, 2017.  Please check the Stormwater Permit link below for more information.

Please check the Stormwater Permit page for more information.

2015 Comprehensive Storm Drainage Plan (PDF 13 MB)

LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT STORMWATER REGULATIONS
On January 1, 2017, new stormwater management regulations and standards went into effect in the City of Auburn and surrounding jurisdictions in Western Washington for new development, redevelopment, and construction sites.  These Low Impact Development (LID) regulations and standards emphasize on-site stormwater management that mimics predevelopment conditions rather than storage and conveyance-based stormwater management.   The goal of LID is to prevent degradation of our streams, wetlands, and rivers from the runoff from developed sites.  Starting in 2017, these new LID principles and best management practices (BMPs) will be incorporated into new projects that are not vested under the 2009 City of Auburn stormwater standards. 

The following is a compilation of some of the resources available to help property owners with new development or redevelopment projects comply with the new LID requirements.

Additional LID Resources

For additional information about LID in Auburn, please see the links below.

Stormwater Pollution

Clear Drain GraphicThe Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)identifies stormwater as the biggest source of pollution to lakes, rivers, and streams in our country. The source of this pollution has been traced to how we as citizens live our daily lives. Rainwater picks up pollutants from the air, buildings, parking lots and from road surfaces. These pollutants include chemicals, oils, sand, dirt, pet waste and other debris.

Storm drains carry rainwater to the nearest natural body of water. Disposing of oils, detergents, pet waste and other materials into the storm drain is the same as dumping them directly into a stream, wetland, lake or Puget Sound.

We encourage people who live, work and play in Auburn to help keep our stormwater and natural water bodies clean. Removing contaminants from stormwater is not nearly as effective as eliminating the pollutant at the source. You can help us out by using some of the following suggestions:

  • Keep leaves, yard waste or other debris out of the storm drains
  • Report spills or water pollution, in the City of Auburn, to 253-931-3048, Option 8 
  • Clean up your pet waste - bag it and put it in the trash
  • Wash your car at a car wash, or wash it on the lawn or where the wash water won't go into a storm drain. Learn more about Auburn's Car Wash Kit Program.
  • Use fertilizers and pesticides sparingly
  • Fix leaks of auto fluids and recycle oil at a local auto parts store

For more information on protecting waterways, visit the Puget Sound Starts Here website.

For more information view the Storm Water Management Manual and Comprehensive Storm Plan.